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  • Windows on ARMFitting more computing capacity into a limited power envelope is one of the key challenges facing data centre designers today. It impacts companies whether they are building a £500 million data centre or simply working how much compute that can fit into a couple of racks at a shared facility.

  • Windows on ARMIt's well known Linux and ARM developers have clashed over the past few months over how best to support ARM in the Linux kernel. ITworld blogger Brian Proffitt describes the problem as a "United Nations-level complexity of the forks in the ARM section of the Linux kernel." Linux creator Linus Torvalds threatened to stop accepting ARM-related changes to the mainline Linux kernel.

  • Windows on ARMAfter initial success, Intel's netbook strategy is at a crossroads as demand for tablets and low-cost laptops with larger screens rises, a company executive said this week. - Buyers don't want the cheapest PCs anymore, but desire snappy performance and better features on their computing devices, said Greg Welch, segment director for mobile client platforms at Intel. Netbooks' early success was partly due to low prices, but now performance is high on the list of buyers' priorities.

  • Windows on ARMCHIPMAKER Intel expects software developers to have their work cut out for them when Windows 8 hits the ARM architecture. - Microsoft's decision to produce a version of its upcoming Windows 8 operating system for the ARM architecture has led some to predict the demise of Intel in the smartphone and tablet space.

  • Windows on ARMOn the back of good but not great earnings Wednesday, Intel CEO Paul Otellini was queried about how Windows 8--the first mainstream operating system from Microsoft to support ARM chips--will change the competitive landscape.

  • Windows on ARM

    The desktop computer as we know it could be in danger! Our hobby is doomed! - Let's face it. We're all going to be reading these words a trillion times during the next 12 months. So we decided to head this one off at the pass. Is the onset of ARM a real threat to desktop computing, or is it more of an evolutionary force?

  • Windows on ARM

    Among the many Windows 8 topics that Microsoft hasn't discussed is what ARM performance is going to be like. After all, while Windows ARM tablets will have dual core or quad core cpus running at a 1.8 or 2.5GHz speed – faster than most netbook Atom processors and the Celerons in cheap ultraportables, or even ultra-low power Core i5s - what does that mean for an operating system as complex as Windows?

  • Windows on ARM

    The entire mobile computing  market is about to experience a substantial change, from the predominant use of the ARM processor to that of Intel and AMD – potentially. Currently, the tablet market is dominated by ARM chips produced by Qualcomm, Texas Instruments and Nvidia. And, until now, unlike laptops, tablets haven’t sported Intel or AMD silicon.

  • Windows on ARM

    When Windows 8 comes out it’s bound to cause a great deal of excitement in the tablet market. For the first time there will be an excellent and truly viable Windows tablet operating system and it’s bound to shake up the market. It’s also very likely to cause a great deal of confusion though and this is because Windows 8 on Intel chips and Windows 8 on ARM chips will be very different beasts. They’ll operate in different ways, run different software and be updated differently.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft introduced a number of tablet concepts during a partner preview event earlier this week. - The software giant held a technical demonstration at Computex on Thursday to demonstrate Windows 8 to hardware partners. Mike Angiulo, corporate vice president of Windows Planning, Hardware and PC Ecosystem at Microsoft, demonstrated Windows 8 on a variety of tablets.

  • Windows on ARM

    Microsoft demonstrated a number of early prototypes on Thursday for ARM based Windows 8 tablets. - The software giant held a technical demonstration at Computex on Thursday to demonstrate Windows 8 to hardware partners. Mike Angiulo, corporate vice president of Windows Planning, Hardware and PC Ecosystem at Microsoft, demonstrated Windows 8 on a variety of tablets. 

  • Windows on ARM

    Unless you’ve been living under a rock then you’ll know that Microsoft has finally revealed a few details on its Windows 8 plans. - The software giant demonstrated its new Windows 8 user interface on Wednesday, targeted towards touch screen devices. The interface takes several elements from Windows Phone and introduces live tile applications inside of a full desktop/mobile version of Windows. Where does this leave Windows Phone Mango and beyond?

  • Windows on ARMThat Windows 8 was going to run on ARM CPUs has been known for a while, but it looks like only now have reports appeared about just when tablets loaded with it will be formally launched. The major barrier that ARM faced when approaching the PC market was the fact that its processors were not supported by the Microsoft Windows operating system.

  • Windows on ARMIntel revealed on Tuesday that Microsoft’s next-generation Windows tablet experience will run on Intel and ARM chips. - Speaking at an Intel investor meeting on Tuesday, Renee James explained that Windows 8 will be available in versions for both x86 and ARM. James revealed there will be a Windows 8 Traditional flavour that will run on Intel’s chips and handle legacy applications. Microsoft is also planning a Windows 7 mode as part of the traditional SKU.

  • Windows on ARMARM has been cooperating with Microsoft to develop processor architectures according to reports. - ARM president Philip Lu revealed that the company is working closely with Microsoft but refused to detail specifics at a press conference on Tuesday. Digitimes notes that ARM has licensed its latest Cortex A15 patents to several chip manufacturers including Samsung Electronics and Texas Instruments, with products expected to be launched in late 2011 or early 2012, Lu said.

  • Windows on ARMWhile "Windows runs on ARM now" is a really easy thing to say, it's an extremely complicated subject, fraught with industry drama, technical accomplishment, and a hint of Microsoft's vision for the future.


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Windows on ARM - Windows RT