compatibility

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft has published the hardware requirements that manufacturers must follow if they want to slap a "Designed for Windows 8" sticker onto their systems. In among many innocuous requirements - multitouch systems must support at least five points of touch, there must be at least 10 GB of free space available to the user, and more - are a set of requirements for Windows 8 systems' firmware.

  • Windows on ARMAt the beginning of December, we warned the Copyright Office that operating system vendors would use UEFI secure boot anticompetitively, by colluding with hardware partners to exclude alternative operating systems. As Glyn Moody points out, Microsoft has wasted no time in revising its Windows Hardware Certification Requirements to effectively ban most alternative operating systems on ARM-based devices that ship with Windows 8.

  • Windows on ARMThe closer we get to the actual release of Windows 8 ARM tablets the more I'm mulling over the pros and cons, and wondering just how successful such devices will actually turn out to be.  At the moment Windows 7 tablets are pretty powerful machines. They have a great many advantages over every other tablet with support for just about any USB device and the ability to run full desktop apps such as Microsoft Office.

  • Windows on ARMAt the Consumer Electronics Show this week, there’s been a lot of buzz created by Microsoft. Most of the activity surrounds consumer technology like Kinect, phones, and tablets, though, and not Windows 8 like I’d hoped. I have seen stories of a handful of demonstrations of the ARM version of Windows 8 running on tablets, and that brings to mind something important that is often overlooked: the apps you run in Windows on your Intel computer are not going to be compatible with the version of Windows that runs on ARM.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft is putting a devoting a significant amount of time, effort and money into making Windows 8 'touch-enabled' ready for loading onto tablets. But are Windows 8 tablets already irrelevant. Here's the problem. Microsoft is putting an awful lot of time, effort and money into making Windows 8 a touch-enabled operating system that will work on both desktop and tablet, x86 and ARM hardware. 

  • Windows on ARMPaul Thurrott demonstrates Windows 8 on the tablet in this edition of Windows IT Pro Insider. Along with Sean Deuby, Michael Otey, and Jeff James, Paul walks through the touch-screen interface and the start menu. He demonstrates the picture password feature where you can use gestures to log in.

  • Windows on ARMAnalysis: Why legacy app support is a big deal for Microsoft's new OS - Windows 8 is coming. We've heard all about it, poked around with it and really rather like it. What Microsoft is doing is good and, what's more, it might breed a whole new range of multipurpose computing devices that go beyond the tablet.

  • Windows on ARMThe Web today is abuzz with all sorts of conflicting stories about running "legacy" Windows 7 apps on the ARM Windows 8 desktop. Microsoft hasn't given a simple yes-or-no answer to this vexing question, but I thought Galen Gruman nailed it several days ago, in his post "Windows 8 on ARM chips: It was too good to be true." He says that ARM-based Windows 8 machines won't run X86 apps, referencing Steve Sinofsky's response during the earnings call last Wednesday.

  • Windows on ARMI've heard numerous folks who attended Build in person and/or via Webcasts say that there will be no Desktop app experience when Windows 8 ships on PCs and tablets running on ARM processors. Until today, I thought the same. But this is not correct.

  • Windows on ARMIt really should have been obvious, but in case you were confused, ARM versions of Windows 8 will not be able to run x86 apps and vice-versa. In fact, Microsoft has said as much in the past. This is a model Microsoft has used unsuccessfully in the past, but are things different now? Will ISVs make more than one binary?

  • Windows on ARMWindows 8 ARM PCs will not, in fact, have full app compatibility with software designed for x86 Windows 7 and 8 computers, Microsoft has confirmed, instead demanding that developers port their titles over to the new architecture. Despite earlier suggestions that seemed to indicate otherwise, Windows president Steven Sinofsky clarified during an analyst Q&A this week that while new apps coded for the Metro UI will work on both x86 and ARM tablets, laptops and other computers, existing software will not.

  • Windows on ARMApps written for x86 Windows PCs won't be able to run on ARM-based Win 8 tablets, according to a Microsoft exec who says his earlier statements about cross-platform compatibility were misinterpreted. - In a clarification, a Microsoft executive said x86 applications built to run on the desktop version of Windows 8 won't be compatible with the tablet version of the operating system. The executive also said that the tablet version won't be able run any applications built for previous versions of Windows.

  • Windows on ARMThe matter of whether existing Windows applications will run on Windows 8 on ARM – putting them on tablets – has been kicked back and forth a lot this year. Intel this spring pointed out that Windows applications running on x86 for PCs won't run on Windows 8 on ARM.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft has been working on its ARM-supporting Windows version and, since tests are already being carried out, companies, in this case Dell, have started to come forth and say their piece.

  • Windows on ARMTHE SMARTPHONE AND TABLET ecosystem based on ARM chip designs is a hodge-podge of companies making random pieces of hardware and throwing things against the wall to see what ships, Linux creator Linus Torvalds said at Linuxcon yesterday.

  • Windows on ARMThe obvious way forward, then, is to use one operating system across the board. And that has to be Windows NT; it's the more capable of Microsoft's two operating systems, and it has that all-important compatibility with existing desktop applications. The Xbox already uses a Windows NT derivative; bringing it in line with Windows 8 is a natural evolution of the platform.

  • Windows on ARM

    During Microsoft's presentation of Windows 8, a handful of the company's hardware partners showed off tablets and notebooks running the OS, some also featuring Microsoft Office. But if you looked closely, you would've noticed that missing from the equation were Intel and AMD, replaced instead by ARM chips made by rival ARM Holdings.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft has said that recent comments from Intel software chief Renée James on the next version of Windows were "factually inaccurate and unfortunately misleading."

  • Windows on ARMUpdate: Microsoft has taken issue with Intel's comments on the next version of Windows. An update to this story can be found here. - Microsoft may be porting Windows 8 to the ARM architecture, but the general manager of Intel's software and services group insists she's not losing any sleep over a bruising battle in a more-competitive arena. At least when it comes to PCs.


Facebook Twitter RSS E-Mail

Windows on ARM - Windows RT