apps

  • Windows on ARMSuddenly, the new Microsoft doesn't look all that different from the old one. During court proceedings for the 1998-2001 antitrust trial, government lawyers accused Microsoft of playing favorites by providing its developers access to information not available to third parties -- thus giving Internet Explorer unfair competitive advantage over Netscape. The company's browser policy regarding Windows RT isn't just much the same, it's much more. IE gets hugely exclusive access. The question: Is it anticompetitive?

  • Windows on ARMSummary: Microsoft will restrict third-party browsers like Firefox and Chrome to the Metro sandbox in Windows 8 for ARM devices, while treating Internet Explorer 10 as an "intrinsic feature" of Windows. Mozilla and its primary backer, Google, say that's not fair.

  • Windows on ARMAs Windows 8 approaches, Mozilla developers have been working hard on a Metro version. If you're using Windows 8 on the desktop, no problem. Tablet users, however, are going to be denied a fully functional Firefox - and will face restrictions on many other third-party applications. In the name of security, Microsoft is forcing them into a "sandbox" on ARM devices. The lockdown renegs on the company's prior promises, and it's going to have some far-reaching effects on many applications.

  • Windows on ARMWhen ARM tablets running Windows 8 ship, Chrome, Firefox, and other browsers will be at a disadvantage, because Internet Explorer will be the only browser allowed to take advantage of certain features of the operating system. Mozilla and Google are crying "foul." Do the restrictions really matter?

  • Windows on ARMRaising the specter of last-generation browser battles, Mozilla launches a publicity campaign to seek a place for browsers besides IE on Windows devices using ARM chips. Stop me if you've heard this one before: Microsoft muscles aside other browsers and cements the dominance of Internet Explorer. The browser market, deprived of competition, stagnates.

  • Windows on ARMIn a recent development, Microsoft unveiled three editions of its next Windows products, namely, the consumer-friendly Windows 8, the more advanced and versatile Windows 8 Pro and the tablet-friendly Windows RT.

  • Windows on ARMComputerworld - Windows 8 on ARM, now dubbed Windows RT by Microsoft, will include Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote applications, according to a chart included in a blog by Microsoft posted yesterday.

  • Windows on ARMThere's been a bit of discussion about the difference between "desktop apps" and "Metro style apps" on Windows 8, particularly as it pertains to Windows RT (previously Windows on ARM), which currently isn't going to allow third party development of desktop apps. Part of the confusion comes from the fact that you can use native C++ code in a Metro style app.

  • Windows on ARMOne of the most appealing features that Windows on ARM will arrive on shelves with is Office 15 applications, meant to run in the desktop mode that Windows users are so familiar with. - Reports on Microsoft planning the inclusion of Office 15 in Windows 8 emerged ever since last year, and have all been confirmed last week, when Windows President Steven Sinofsky provided more details on Windows on ARM.

  • Windows on ARMOne of the main focuses Microsoft has announced for the next flavor of its desktop client, Windows 8, is the availability of a consistent experience across all devices. That also includes the development of applications for Windows on ARM, which is now to be the same as when it comes to building apps for x86 architectures.

  • Windows on ARMAt the Consumer Electronics Show this week, there’s been a lot of buzz created by Microsoft. Most of the activity surrounds consumer technology like Kinect, phones, and tablets, though, and not Windows 8 like I’d hoped. I have seen stories of a handful of demonstrations of the ARM version of Windows 8 running on tablets, and that brings to mind something important that is often overlooked: the apps you run in Windows on your Intel computer are not going to be compatible with the version of Windows that runs on ARM.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft is considering dropping support for regular software on Windows 8 on ARM tablets, according to the latest leaks, leaving owners of the slates with only Metro-style apps to play with. Contrary to original suggestions from Microsoft, that developers – although having to rewrite their x86 software to suit ARM chipsets – would be able to release regular, desktop versions of their apps for Windows 8 tablets, that decision now looks like it will be reversed, ZDNet reports.

  • Windows on ARMI've been a bit busy on non-coding stuff as of late, but I did manage to get some time to install the Windows 8 Developer Preview natively. Previously I had been running it on a VirtualBox VM, which worked but only supported non-accelerated video and was prone to heavy freezing for minutes at a time.

  • Windows on ARMThe Web today is abuzz with all sorts of conflicting stories about running "legacy" Windows 7 apps on the ARM Windows 8 desktop. Microsoft hasn't given a simple yes-or-no answer to this vexing question, but I thought Galen Gruman nailed it several days ago, in his post "Windows 8 on ARM chips: It was too good to be true." He says that ARM-based Windows 8 machines won't run X86 apps, referencing Steve Sinofsky's response during the earnings call last Wednesday.

  • Windows on ARMI've heard numerous folks who attended Build in person and/or via Webcasts say that there will be no Desktop app experience when Windows 8 ships on PCs and tablets running on ARM processors. Until today, I thought the same. But this is not correct.

  • Windows on ARMOne of the first things Windows 8 chief Steven Sinofsky said in the Build keynote this week was that all the demos were “equally at home on ARM and on x86.” However, besides that statement and our brief look at the Developer Preview running on an Nvidia quad-core Kal-El reference tablet, Microsoft remained relatively tight-lipped on the new architecture support – especially on when it will release the ARM version of Win 8 to developers and how it plans to address the fact that future ARM PCs won’t run x86 desktop apps.

  • Windows on ARMWindows 8 ARM PCs will not, in fact, have full app compatibility with software designed for x86 Windows 7 and 8 computers, Microsoft has confirmed, instead demanding that developers port their titles over to the new architecture. Despite earlier suggestions that seemed to indicate otherwise, Windows president Steven Sinofsky clarified during an analyst Q&A this week that while new apps coded for the Metro UI will work on both x86 and ARM tablets, laptops and other computers, existing software will not.

  • Windows on ARMApps written for x86 Windows PCs won't be able to run on ARM-based Win 8 tablets, according to a Microsoft exec who says his earlier statements about cross-platform compatibility were misinterpreted. - In a clarification, a Microsoft executive said x86 applications built to run on the desktop version of Windows 8 won't be compatible with the tablet version of the operating system. The executive also said that the tablet version won't be able run any applications built for previous versions of Windows.

  • Windows on ARMUpdate: Microsoft has taken issue with Intel's comments on the next version of Windows. An update to this story can be found here. - Microsoft may be porting Windows 8 to the ARM architecture, but the general manager of Intel's software and services group insists she's not losing any sleep over a bruising battle in a more-competitive arena. At least when it comes to PCs.


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Windows on ARM - Windows RT