analysis

  • Windows on ARMSummary: You can pick up an iPad starting at $499, a Kindle Fire for $199, and there are even Android tablets that come in at around $99 - So how much would you be willing to pay for a Windows 8 tablet?

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft's First Apps contest offers tantalizing hints, but there's still no guarantee when we'll see ARM version of Windows - At the Windows Store presentation yesterday, Windows Web Services VP Antoine Leblond mentioned that the much-anticipated Windows 8 beta would arrive in "late February" -- but there's more to the story.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft is putting a devoting a significant amount of time, effort and money into making Windows 8 'touch-enabled' ready for loading onto tablets. But are Windows 8 tablets already irrelevant. Here's the problem. Microsoft is putting an awful lot of time, effort and money into making Windows 8 a touch-enabled operating system that will work on both desktop and tablet, x86 and ARM hardware. 

  • Windows on ARMEver since Microsoft first announced that Windows 8 would be compatible with certain ARM system-on-chip processors, questions about what this would mean for existing Windows applications have been abundant. ARM's strength is in low-power applications, and the decision to support the architecture was plainly motivated by the needs of the tablet market—which left observers wondering just how much of Windows would actually be supported on ARM? Just the bits relevant to tablet and consumer applications, or the whole shebang?

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft may be shedding the traditional Windows desktop on Windows 8 ARM tablets to deliberately create a more iPad-like design, according to an inside source. Well-known Microsoft-focused technology writer Paul Thurrott stated shortly into TWiT's Windows Weekly podcast (embedded below) that the current plan was to not only pull the traditional Windows desktop from ARM systems but prevent them from running conventional apps compiled for ARM. Only the touch-native Metro interface would be available, Thurrott heard.

  • Windows on ARMForget Android tablets and the iPad, there are a lot of folks waiting for the much ballyhooed Windows 8 tablets due to hit next year. A lot of folks believe a full computer like the Windows 8 tablets will offer lots more utility than the toy tablets currently available. The reality hasn't hit these folks yet, that these future slates aren't really aimed at the current tablet market.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft is stepping up their game to compete with their rival, the iPad. According to a new report by Electronista, Windows 8 on ARM tablets may ditch the traditional desktop to a Metro only design. The move seems to be a reversal from original suggestions from the tech giant.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft is considering dropping support for regular software on Windows 8 on ARM tablets, according to the latest leaks, leaving owners of the slates with only Metro-style apps to play with. Contrary to original suggestions from Microsoft, that developers – although having to rewrite their x86 software to suit ARM chipsets – would be able to release regular, desktop versions of their apps for Windows 8 tablets, that decision now looks like it will be reversed, ZDNet reports.

  • Windows on ARMZDNet reported yesterday that Microsoft is getting a version of Office ready for the iPad. The new versions of Word, Excel, and Powerpoint will be aimed at bringing a “real” office suite to the iPad, to compete with Apple’s iWorks suite. The interesting rumor has Microsoft pricing the Office apps at $10 to compete directly with the apps from Apple. This leads to the realization that Microsoft faces a dilemma when it comes time to price the Office apps for its own Windows 8 tablets coming down the pike.

  • Windows on ARMARM RISC-based processors running Microsoft Windows 8 are expected to make an official appearance by the end of 2012 - and could begin seriously competing in the notebook market by June 2013. Indeed, industry heavyweights such as Nvidia and Qualcomm have been souping up the raw horsepower of their next-gen ARM chips, while simultaneously tweaking power consumption requirements.

  • Windows on ARMYesterday it emerged that Microsoft's Windows 8 tablets, running on ARM chips (less power consuming than Intel's offerings), are finally due in mid-2013. It's exciting news for Windows fans, and probably something that enterprise IT professionals will make a mental note to be pre-prepared for. But it might all be in vain. Microsoft's Windows 8 tablets may already be too late, out-innovated by faster-moving rivals.

  • Windows on ARMSAN JOSE, Calif. – Phil Carmack started his career designing IBM plug-compatible mainframes for Amdahl.  Later, he was the lead architect for 3DO, Trip Hawkins' high flying video game console startup that ultimately sold the box Carmack helped develop to Panasonic for $100 million.

  • Windows on ARMTo say Intel CEO Paul Otellini is upbeat about the prospects for Microsoft's Windows 8 may be a bit of an understatement. In fact, Otellini said Windows 8 is "one of the best things that's ever happened to our company." That's one pretty heady statement. Speaking at a Credit Suisse technology conference, Otellini batted away worries that he called myths surrounding Intel. These myths covered the idea that ARM will hurt Intel, that the PC is toast and that the chip giant can't do mobile well.

  • Windows on ARMUnnamed sources within notebook vendors are reporting that the Windows on ARM platform (Windows 8 + ARM-based SoC) is expected to make its official debut towards the end of 2012. Actual products may not enter the notebook sector until June 2013, and will likely be powered by Nvidia and Qualcomm ARM-based processors used in notebooks from Asus, Lenovo and other vendors.

  • Windows on ARMForrester is bullish on Windows 8 as a product for consumers. With Windows 8, Microsoft is adapting Windows in key ways that make it better suited to compete in the post-PC era, including a touch-first UI, an app marketplace, and the ability to run natively on SoC/ARM processors. This pivot in product strategy and product design makes sense as we move deeper into an era when computing form factors reach far beyond traditional desktops and laptops.

  • Windows on ARMWindows on ARM (WoA), a combination of Windows 8 and ARM-based processors, is expected to make an official appearance at the end of 2012 and will try to compete in the notebook market as soon as June 2013, according to sources from notebook vendors.

  • Windows on ARMThe window of opportunity for Microsoft to come out with a Windows tablet that successfully challenges the iPad is closing, according to a report from Forrester Research to be published Tuesday.

  • Windows on ARMIn past articles I've talked about how I think that ARM will have an uphill battle if it wants to establish itself in the desktop/laptop market with Windows 8. I just feel that x86 is a better choice standard PCs, primarily because of its support of older Windows applications that require an x86 processor to run.

  • Windows on ARMThe writing has been on the wall for a while now, that the close relationship between Microsoft and Intel (and by extension AMD) is crumbling into dust. In fact, they have never really been the best of friends. It has been clear since Microsoft unveiled that Windows 8 would run natively on ARM processors that things would never be quite the same again. Apart from some niche server variants of Windows, which could run on Itanium and other processors, all the previous desktop versions, including Windows 7, have run on x86 (and x64 for the last 6 years or so) processors.

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft's cavalry is on the offensive, with Windows 8 and Ultrabooks on track to challenge Steve Jobs' post-PC legacy. - Microsoft might have won the war with Apple for PC market-share years ago, but there's no question that Apple's dominance in this so-called post-PC era, when the centre of computing shifts from the PC/notebook to the tablet, smartphone and cloud has led many to claim the Wintel era is coming to a close.


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Windows on ARM - Windows RT