analysis

  • Windows on ARMMicrosoft's Surface RT tablet has a sales problem, according to new analyst estimates. Despite the almost omnipresent Surface RT advertising blitz that has been blanketing television screens for months now, IHS iSuppli believes that only 680,000 to 750,000 of the tablets have sold since the slate's October 26 launch, while IDC released a report Thursday stating that Microsoft only shipped 900,000 Surface RT tablets to retail.

  • Windows on ARMOut of all the products Microsoft is going forward with, Windows RT is undoubtedly the biggest mess. Xbox continues to see strong sales, Surface packs impressive hardware, Windows Phone 8 is gaining traction, Office is soon to see a new release and Windows 8 is selling millions of licences. But Windows RT? It's all over the place.

  • Windows on ARMAnalysis Industry doomsayers were circling Windows 8 like buzzards before it even launched, but they picked the wrong carcass. Microsoft's real 2012 roadkill was Win8's ARM-powered cousin, Windows RT.

  • Windows on ARMLatest data from advertisement network AdDuplex reveals usage statistics of both Windows 8 and Windows RT in the first month of 2013. Information presented in this report was collected on January 14th (112 Windows Store apps running the AdDuplex SDK). As well as usages, Windows RT devices and multiple geographic locations are also included.

  • Windows on ARMAh, Vegas. It's the place where dreams are realized, and hearts are shattered. As such, probably no more appropriate venue exists to showcase the massive gamble that is Windows RT, Microsoft's first tablet-focused operating system, and the first Windows version created expressly for ARM processors.

  • Windows on ARMOn Sunday, it was reported that the Windows RT operating system had been hacked to allow unsigned ARM desktop applications to run.  Microsoft responded quickly to say that it was investigating the findings and is now saying that it doesn't consider this to be a security vulnerability.

  • Windows on ARMI spoke with ARM CEO Warren East at CES on Tuesday, who was kind enough to explain the complexities of his company's business model, along with addressing some of the exciting opportunities and challenges ARM is up against — in short, Microsoft and Intel.

  • Windows on ARMReports from earlier in the week suggested that Windows RT had been "jailbroken" by hackers, an event I ignored because the outcome was so obvious. And, as expected, Microsoft has confirmed the hack and will simply fix it in a pending update. But why does everyone take this stuff so seriously?

  • Windows on ARMNVIDIA this week unveiled the Tegra 4, which it describes as the world's fastest mobile processor. Given the lackluster performance of Windows RT on the Tegra 4's predecessor, I'm curious whether NVIDIA's stated advances will lead to better Windows RT devices in the near future, and perhaps a new Surface RT.

  • Windows on ARMAs some analysts scale back the number of Surface tablets that Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) will sell this quarter, the bigger concern now is if the device's Windows RT operating system is hurting Mr. Softy itself.

  • Windows on ARMThe "Microsoft tablet is a failure meme" was old from the start. Every day there's some new blog based on rumor or innuendo assuring everyone who pays attention that Surface is doomed and sales are this side of worse than terrible. There is so much nonsense punditry, I don't know where to start.

  • Windows on ARMAt Microsoft's shareholder meeting last week, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said, "Sometimes getting innovation right across hardware and software is difficult unless you do both of them." He's right, of course – innovative software is set up by equally innovative hardware.

  • Windows on ARMWhen Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer admitted that sales of the company's much-hyped Surface tablet had been "modest", it did little more than raise a few eyebrows. Then, a few days later, the chief of the company's Windows division, Steven Sinofsky, resigned.

  • Windows on ARMI've long been thinking of doing a series of postings on both Microsoft and the industry's use of telemetry and was about ready to start when I realized I'd rather put a cart before the horse.  Many have scratched their head about Windows RT, and in particular its lack of support for third-party "desktop" apps.  Ultimately I think Windows RT is the result of heavy reliance on telemetry.

  • Windows on ARMGetting to grips with Windows RT's development environments, and converting full-strength Windows 8 apps down to its cut-down RT partner is "nuanced" work that requires "quite a lot [developers] will need to "implement specifically," Microsoft cloud partner Aditi's CTO Wade Wegner has told Computing.

  • Windows on ARMComputerworld - Microsoft has confirmed what many had suspected, that it didn't offer a 16GB Surface RT tablet because there would have been virtually no room for customer content on the device.

  • Windows on ARMHollywood often withholds badly conceived movies from reviewers so that bad press doesn't adversely affect the opening weekend box office. So it was with Surface with Windows RT, for me at least: Microsoft refused to let me even peek at this machine ahead of the launch day. And although the Surface is no dud -- in fact, it's very well made -- Surface RT is no PC replacement.

  • Windows on ARMAfter forcing myself to use Microsoft's Surface tablet running Windows RT, I came away genuinely impressed. In such a crowded market, though, the Surface still faces an uphill battle.

  • Windows on ARMComputerworld - The apps for Microsoft's new Windows operating systems are good enough to entice early buyers of tablets and other touch devices, analysts said Sunday. But the jury remains out on Microsoft's long-term chances of winning its unprecedented bet on Windows 8 and the spin-off, Windows RT.

  • Windows on ARMA case could be made that Microsoft has done a poor job marketing Windows 8. Given that it is spending upwards of a billion (with a B) dollars on promotions, the problem is not in hyping the new operating system, but in explaining the differences between Windows 8 for x86 devices and Windows RT, the Windows 8 designed for ARM-based machines.


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Windows on ARM - Windows RT